CDC adds mood disorders and schizophrenia to their list of medical conditions associated with higher risk from COVID-19 infection.

On October 14, 2021, the CDC added mood disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders to their list of medical conditions associated with higher risk for those with COVID-19 infections. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is a national public health agency of the United States.

Click here to read the CDC announcement.

The CDC’s decision was based in part on the two meta-analyses/systematic reviews listed below.

The first analysis was based on individual studies covering December 2019 to July 2020. The authors conclude that:

… mental health disorders were associated with increased COVID-19-related mortality. Thus, patients with mental health disorders should have been targeted as a high-risk population for severe forms of COVID-19, requiring enhanced preventive and disease management strategies. Future studies should more accurately evaluate the risk for patients with each mental health disorder. However, the highest risk seemed to be found in studies including individuals with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorders.

The second analysis was based on individual studies through February 1, 2021. The authors conclude that:

… individuals with preexisting mood disorders are at higher risk of COVID-19 hospitalization and death and should be categorized as an at-risk group on the basis of a preexisting condition.

Scientific evidence used by the CDC in adding mood disorders and schizophrenia to their list:

  • “Association Between Mental Health Disorders and Mortality Among Patients With COVID-19 in 7 Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”, Guillaume Fond, et al., JAMA Psychiatry, 2021 Jul 27; e212274. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.2274. Click here to read the study.
  • “Association Between Mood Disorders and Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Death: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”, Felicia Ceban, et al., JAMA Psychiatry, 2021 Oct 1;78(10):1079-1091. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.1818. Click here to read the study.

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